About Us

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria (GF) is sustained by public-private partnerships, and includes the participation of non-governmental actors in its governance and decision-making structures. The contribution of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) to the development of the Global Fund and the scale up of its programs is crucial to ending the three diseases. The Global Fund values the important role played by civil society in developing countries and thus includes NGO representations as full voting members on its Board.

The Developing Country NGO Delegation (the “Delegation”) is one of three civil society constituencies on the Board and represents the perspectives of NGOs and NGO implementers in recipient countries. The Delegation aims to contribute to and influence Global Fund policies and practices in an effort to make them continually and appropriately responsive to the needs of people living with or affected by HIV and AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria and the NGOs and community based organizations (CBOs) providing services and support to address these diseases.

Global Fund Board Members are expected to be technically competent in the areas of public health, human rights and development. The Developing Country Delegation has the added responsibility of representing and being accountable to diverse constituencies from the Global South. In addition, the Delegation demands a high degree of transparency, effective communication, meaningful consultation and accountability from the organization and its Board.

Delegation Mission, Vision and Values

MISSION
The Developing Country NGO (DCNGO) Delegation works to strengthen the engagement of civil society actors and organizations in developing countries to contribute towards achieving the following vision:

VISION
A world in which AIDS, TB and Malaria are no longer global, public health and human rights threats.

VALUES
The Delegation is underpinned by the following guiding values:

  • ACCOUNTABILITY to constituencies, the Global Fund and the Delegation itself;

  • TRANSPARENCY concerning representation and decision-making processes;

  • INCLUSIVENESS in internal and external consultation as well as representation;

  • Effective and sensitive COMMUNICATION both within and external to the Delegation;

  • Commitment to working in PARTNERSHIP with other Board Delegations and relevant stakeholders;

  • SENSITIVITY to diversity of the Delegation and its constituencies;

  • RESPECT for the democratic processes of the Delegation;

  • Demonstrable commitment to PROFESSIONALISM and TEAMWORK;

  • EQUITY in contribution and support to the work of the Delegation.

How we Work

The Delegation is committed to representing and responding to the needs and interests of the constituency it serves. The approach is bi-directional. The Delegation carries the issues and concerns of the constituency to the Global Fund and informs the constituency about the Global Fund policies and decisions.

The Delegation represents individuals and organizations from almost 140 countries with great diversity in terms of social economic conditions, impact of the three diseases and conditions for key and vulnerable populations. The Delegation is chosen to mirror this diversity. Delegation members are expected to regularly reach out to their disease or issue specific networks to seek input on decisions and share outcomes of Board meetings. When funding is available the Leadership Team is encouraged to support delegates to represent the Delegation at relevant regional/global, issue or disease specific meetings and consultations. Participating in these meetings gives the Delegation an opportunity to seek feedback from the constituents it represents regarding Global Fund Board policy discussions.

History of the Delegation

The Developing Country NGO Delegation was established when the Global Fund began in 2002 and since that time members of the Delegation have played an active role in Global Fund governance and provided leadership in several important areas. A few examples are as follows:

  • In 2008, members lobbied successfully for the hiring of civil society officers to join the Global Fund Secretariat, a step which, along with dual track financing and the NGO rule, increased the Global Fund’s capacity to support civil society engagement in governance and implementation.

  • In 2010 the Delegation proposed the establishment of the Implementer’s Group which has been very successful in building the effectiveness of implementers on Global Fund governance issues.

  • In 2012 the Delegation conducted an in-depth survey of the challenges experienced by civil society as implementers of Global Fund grants. The report was helpful as the Global Fund undertook a major reorientation of its processes and introduced a new funding model.

  • In 2015, the Delegation worked closely with the Global Fund Secretariat, the Office of Inspector General and local partners to host a series of risk management workshops in four regions. Over 50 regional organizations participated in the fora to learn about risk management tools and techniques.

  • In 2016, the Delegation lead an advocacy campaign urging the World Bank to amend the country classification system because of its negative impact on the ability of many countries to access funding from the Global Fund. A petition with over 300 signatures was delivered to the President of the World Bank in October 2016.

History of the Global Fund

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria was created in 2002 to dramatically increase resources to fight three of the world’s most devastating diseases and to direct those resources to areas of greatest need. As a partnership between governments, civil society, the private sector and affected communities, the Global Fund represents an innovative approach to international health financing.

The Global Fund was founded on a set of principles which are articulated in the Global Fund’s Framework Document. These principles guide everything it does – from governance to grant making. The founding principles ensure that the Global Fund will:

• Operate as a financial instrument, not an implementing entity;
• Make available and leverage additional financial resources;
• Support programs that reflect national ownership;
• Operate in a balanced manner in terms of different regions, diseases and interventions;
• Pursue an integrated and balanced approach to prevention and treatment;
• Evaluate proposals through independent review processes
• Establish a simplified, rapid and innovative grant-making process and operate with transparency and accountability.

Governance of the Global Fund

The Global Fund is made up of representatives of both donor and implementing governments, non-governmental organizations, the private sector (including businesses and foundations), and affected communities.

The Board includes 20 voting members, and six ex-officio members i.e. members without voting rights. The voting members consist of two groups of ten members each; the Donor Group and the Implementer Group. The Board was designed to have equality between those who contribute the majority of financial resources to the Global Fund and those who implement programs. Each constituency is represented by a Board Member (BM), Alternate Board Member (ABM), and Communications Focal Point (CFP).

The Developing Country NGO Delegation belongs to the Implementer Group which includes two other civil society Delegations- the Developed Country NGOs and Communities Delegations. The other seven delegations are: Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA); Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMRO); Eastern & Southern Africa (ESA); Latin America and Caribbean (LAC); South East Asia (SEA); Western & Central Africa (WCA); and the Western Pacific Region (WPR).

The ten donor group constituencies are: Canada, Switzerland and Australia; European Commission (Belgium, Finland, Italy, Portugal, Spain); France; Germany; Japan; Point Seven (Ireland, Denmark, Luxemburg, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden); Private Foundations; Private Sector; United Kingdom; and USA.

The ex-officio members are key international development partners – the World Health Organization (WHO); the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS); the World Bank (WB); Partners (including Roll Back Malaria, Stop TB Partnership, Partnership for Maternal and Newborn Child Health, and UNITAID). The other two non-voting seats are for the Swiss Government and the Global Fund Executive Director.

Core Structures

The Global Fund has both global and local structures. The global entities include the Board, and its committees, the Technical Review Panel, and Geneva based staff. The Office of the Inspector General is also a global entity based in Geneva, which reports to the Board of Directors.

Board

The Global Fund Board sets strategy, governs the institution and approves all funding decisions. It is also responsible for assessing organizational performance, overall risk management, partner engagement, resource mobilization and advocacy.

Secretariat

The staff of the Global Fund are responsible for the day-to-day operations of the organization including grant management.

Technical Review Panel

The Technical Review Panel is an independent body of health, development and finance experts which evaluates the technical merit of all requests for funding.

Office of the Inspector General

Reporting directly to the Board, the Office of the Inspector General safeguards the assets, investments, reputation and sustainability of the Global Fund. Through audits, investigations and consultancy work, the Office promotes good practice, reduces risk and reports on abuse.

Local structures are established in each country supported by the Global Fund and include the entities which develop, implement and monitor Global Fund programs. The local structures are in regular communication with the Global Fund Secretariat on grant implementation issues.

Country Coordinating Mechanisms

Each implementing country establishes a national committee or Country Coordinating Mechanism (CCM). The purpose of the CCM is to submit requests for funding on behalf of the entire country and to oversee implementation once the requests have become signed grants. CCMs include representatives of every sector involved in the response to the diseases. In cases where Global Fund support goes to fund a regional or multi-country initiative the oversight role is carried out by a Regional Coordinating Mechanism (RCM) which is made up of representatives from each of the country level CCMs involved in the project. In some cases, the Global Fund will allocate funding to existing regional organizations (ROs). These ROs are encouraged to establish oversight structures similar to RCMs.

Local Fund Agent

Local Fund Agents are independent consultants or consulting companies which assess implementation and data related to performance. As the Global Fund does not have an in-country presence, Local Fund Agents, and CCMs, serve as its eyes and ears on the ground.

Principal and Sub Recipients

Each grant is implemented by a Principal Recipient (PR) which can be any type of organization such as a government ministry, community-based organization or private sector entity. Principal Recipients disburse funds to organizations serving as grant sub-recipients (SR) or even sub-sub-recipients (SSR). Principal Recipients are selected by the Country Coordinating Mechanisms (or in the case of multi-country grants the Regional Coordinating Mechanism) and take on the financial as well as the programmatic responsibilities of the grant.

The role of the Developing Country NGO Delegation is to influence Global Fund policies and practices to make them continually and appropriately responsive to the needs of those affected by HIV and AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

Delegation Membership Criteria

The Delegation represents a constituency which includes national, regional and global NGOs and networks, civil society representatives on CCMs and regional CCMs as well as civil society implementers of Global Fund grants who operate as PRs, SRs and SSRs. Delegates serving on the Delegation reflect this diversity and are drawn from NGOs, CBOs and FBOs working on the three diseases and also organizations working on related crosscutting issues such as human rights, key and vulnerable populations and gender. All members of the Delegation must be living in or employed by or volunteering with, engaged or connected to an organization that has a headquarters or office or operations in a developing country. Members must be living in a developing country.

The Delegation considers it important to include delegates for a period of time from countries that used to receive Global Fund funding and are no longer eligible or implementing and countries that have transitioned to become ineligible. The Delegation will also consider participation of organizations from an otherwise ineligible country which serve as PRs or SRs for multi-country grants.  The underlying principle is that a delegate must have a demonstrated connection to The Global Fund and relevant experience to share in policy development. The Delegation will always strive to have a majority membership from countries currently eligible or implementing Global Fund grants.

Delegates do not represent their own organization (or country) on the Delegation; they act as representatives of the broader regional or issue specific constituency that recommended them to participate in the Delegation. They bring the connections and knowledge of their region or issue-specific concerns to inform decisions taken by the Delegation.

Given the restrictions on registering NGOs in some countries, the Delegation has agreed that members may come from unregistered but organized formal and informal civil society organizations, or other networks.

Remuneration

The members of the DCNGO Delegation serve on a voluntary basis with the permission and support of their host organizations.  Travel expenses related to Delegation work may be reimbursed with prior approval from the BM and ABM. The CFP is a full-time position, with a salary or consultant’s-contract paid from Delegation funds.

Leadership Team

The Leadership Team (LT) is responsible for coordinating the work of the Delegation at Board and committee meetings; reviewing the performance of Delegation members; recruiting and selecting new members to the Delegation; managing conflicts of interest and grievances; and liaising with the Global Fund Secretariat and other Board constituencies. The LT includes: BM, ABM, CFP, Treasurer and any delegate assigned to represent the Delegation on a Global Fund standing committee. The LT calls on support from the full Delegation and in particular from the outgoing BM and ABM.   See Appendix B for the Terms of Reference (TORS) for BM, ABM, CFP and Treasurer.

Board Member (BM)

Elected by the Delegation for a two-year term, the BM is the main representative of the Delegation with responsibility to present and promote the interests of developing country NGOs at Global Fund Board and committee deliberations.  The Board Member and Alternate are encouraged to determine distribution of work between themselves; upon their appointment.

Alternate Board Member (ABM)

The ABM is elected for a two-year term and is the person authorized to represent the Delegation in the absence of the BM or as their replacement on certain issues and concerns. Internal operational concerns such as performance appraisals and recruitment and orientation of new delegates often falls to the ABM.

Communications Focal Point (CFP)

The CFP is recruited through an international competitive call for expressions of interest, the CFP supports the LT to carry out its responsibilities on Global Fund Board and committees. The CFP is the main communications link to the Global Fund Secretariat and supports recruitment, orientation and evaluation of delegates.

Treasurer

A Treasurer is expected to have expressed skills in finance oversight, management and or soft accounting. S/He is elected from among the Delegation members to oversee and report on all financial matters.  Responsibilities include developing and approving an annual budget (in concert with the LT and Fiscal Agent), reviewing budgets for all funding requests and monitoring the budget performance of the Delegation.

Fiscal Agent

The Fiscal Agent often referred to as the Delegation’s Secretariat plays an important role in managing the Delegation’s financial resources, and providing administrative support to the Delegation in areas such as managing bank accounts, travel, logistics, event coordination and management and contracting consultants.  See Appendix B for the detailed TORs for the Fiscal Agent.

Participation in Standing Committees

The standing committees of the Board develop and debate policy recommendations to be approved by the Board. Providing input into the Delegation’s position in committee discussions is crucial. The latitude to change recommendations sent by a committee to the Board for approval is limited. Consequently, delegates need to be particularly active in providing input to the LT and the Delegation’s representative(s) on the standing committees.  Currently, the Board of the Global Fund has three committees that serve to provide specific expertise in the following subject areas:

Audit and Finance Committee

Its role is to ensure optimal performance of the corporate and financial operations of the Global Fund. The committee:

  • Provides oversight of the financial management of the Global Fund’s resources;

  • Provides oversight of the internal and external audit functions;

  • Oversees the investigation functions of the Global Fund.

Ethics and Governance Committee

This committee ensures that the Global Fund and its stakeholders adhere to appropriate standards of ethical behavior. The committee:

  • Oversees implementation of the procedures and operations related to the Global Fund’s governance structure and its core governance functions.

Strategy Committee

This committee guides the strategic focus and investments of the Global Fund. Its purpose is to:

  • Provide oversight of the strategic direction of the Global Fund;

  • Ensure the optimal impact and performance of the Global Fund’s investments in health.

Constituency Board Members, Alternate Board Members and Communications Focal Points since 2002

Year

Board Member

Alternate Board Member

Communications Focal Point

2002

Ms. Milly Katana,
Health Rights Action Group, Uganda

Rev. Dr.  Fidon R. Mwombeki, General Secretary, Northwestern Diocese, Evangelical Lutheran Church in Tanzania

Ms. Lucy Ng’ang’a, Eastern Africa Network of AIDS, Service Organisations Arusha, Tanzania

2003

Ms. Milly Katana, Health Rights Action Group, Uganda

Rev. Dr.  Fidon R. Mwombeki, General Secretary, Northwestern Diocese, Evangelical Lutheran Church in Tanzania

Ms. Lucy Ng’ang’a, Eastern Africa Network of AIDS Service Organisations Arusha, Tanzania

2004

Ms. Rita Arauz Molina, Fundacion Nimehuatzin, Managua

Ms. Razia Essack-Kauaria, Secretary General, Namibia Red Cross Society, Windhoek, Namibia

Ms. Lucy Ng’ang’a, Eastern Africa Network of AIDS, Service Organisations, Arusha, Tanzania

2005

Ms. Rita Arauz Molina, Fundacion Nimehuatzin Managua and
Ms. Elisabeth Mataka, Zambia National AIDS Network (ZNAN) Lusaka, Zambia (BM 12)

Ms. Elisabeth Mataka, Zambia National AIDS Network – ZNAN
Lusaka, Zambia (BP 10 and 11) and
Ms. Lucy Ng’ang’a, Eastern Africa Network of AIDS Service Organisations
Arus0068a, Tanzania (BM12)

Mr. Juan Jacobo Hernandez, Colectivo Sol Tlalpan, México

2006

Ms. Elisabeth Mataka, Zambia National AIDS Network (ZNAN)
Lusaka, Zambia

Dr. Lydia Mungherera, The AIDS Support Organization (TASO), Kampala
Uganda

Ms. Lucy Ng’ang’a, Eastern Africa Network of AIDS Service Organisations
Arusha, Tanzania

2007

Ms. Elisabeth Mataka, Zambia National AIDS Network (ZNAN)
Lusaka, Zambia

Dr Bobby John, Global Health Advocates (India).BM 16 and
Ms Sisonke Msimang, Open Society Initiative for Southern Africa (OSISA) Johannesburg South Africa (BM17)

Mrs Charity Mwila Mpundu Siame,
Zambia AIDS Network (ZNAN) Lusaka BM15) and
Dr Cheikh Tidiane Tall,
African Council of AIDS Service Organizations (AfriCASO) Dakar
Senegal (BM16)

2008

Ms. Elisabeth Mataka, Zambia National AIDS Network (ZNAN)
Lusaka, Zambia and Vice-Chair of the Board

Karlo Boras, Yugoslav Youth Association Against AIDS, Belgrad Serbia

Dr Cheikh Tidiane Tall,
African Council of AIDS Service Organizations (AfriCASO) Dakar, Senegal

2009

Ms. Elisabeth Mataka, Zambia National AIDS Network (ZNAN)
Lusaka, Zambia and Karlo Boras, Yugoslav Youth Association Against AIDS, Belgrad Serbia from (from BM 20)

Karlo Boras, Yugoslav Youth Association Against AIDS, Belgrad Serbia. Dr Bobby John, Global Health Advocates (India) (from BM 20)

Dr Cheikh Tidiane Tall,
African Council of AIDS Service Organizations (AfriCASO) Dakar, Senegal

2010

Karlo Boras, Yugoslav Youth Association Against AIDS, Belgrad Serbia

Dr Bobby John, Global Health Advocates (India)

Dr Cheikh Tidiane Tall,
African Council of AIDS Service Organizations (AfriCASO) Dakar, Senegal

2011

Karlo Boras, Yugoslav Youth Association Against AIDS, Belgrad Serbia. Dr Cheick Tidiane, Tall African Council of AIDS Service Organizations (AFRICASO), Senegal from BM24)

Dr Bobby John, Global Health Advocates (India). Loretta Wong, AIDS Concern, Hong Kong (from BM24)

Dr Cheikh Tidiane Tall,
African Council of AIDS Service Organizations (AfriCASO) Dakar, Senegal

2012

Dr Cheick Tidiane, Tall African Council of AIDS Service Organizations (AFRICASO), Senegal

Loretta Wong, AIDS Concern, Hong Kong (from BM24)

Ria Grant, TB/HIV Care Association, South Africa

2013

Loretta Wong, AIDS Healthcare Foundation(Asia)

Jaevion Nelson, J-FLAG, Jamaica

Ria Grant, TB/HIV Care Association, South Africa

2014

Loretta Wong, AIDS Healthcare Foundation(Asia)

Jaevion Nelson, J-FLAG, Jamaica

Allan Maleche, KELIN- Kenya Legal and Ethical Issues Network on HIV/AIDS Kenya (from BM 32)

Ria Grant, TB/HIV Care Association, South Africa

Jomain McKenzie, Public Health Communications & Policy Consultant (from BM 32)

2015

Loretta Wong, AIDS Healthcare Foundation(Asia)

Hristijan Jankuloski, Healthy Options Project Skopje, MACEDONIA (from BM24)

Allan Maleche, KELIN- Kenya Legal and Ethical Issues Network on HIV/AIDS Kenya

Jomain McKenzie, Independent Consultant

2016

Hristijan Jankuloski, Healthy Options Project Skopje, MACEDONIA

Allan Maleche, KELIN- Kenya Legal and Ethical Issues Network on HIV/AIDS Kenya

Jomain McKenzie, Independent Consultant

2017

Allan Maleche, KELIN- Kenya Legal and Ethical Issues Network on HIV/AIDS Kenya

Edona Deva, Community Development Fund (CDF) Kosovo

Jomain McKenzie, Independent Consultant

2018

Allan Maleche, KELIN- Kenya Legal and Ethical Issues Network on HIV/AIDS Kenya

Edona Deva, Community Development Fund (CDF) Kosovo

Jomain McKenzie, Independent Consultant

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